Mexico

Drugs smuggling on US – Mexico corridor

By Land, Sea or Catapult: How Smugglers Get Drugs Across the Border

The majority of illegal drugs enter the United States in an assortment of vehicles, with drugs hidden in secret compartments in door panels or the roof, gas tanks, tires and even engines.

Smugglers also dig cross-border tunnels, primarily to move large volumes of marijuana. While many tunnels are rudimentary, others have lighting, tracks and ventilation systems, even elevators. As of March 2016, a total of 224 tunnels were discovered on the Southwest border since 1990.

Cargo trains, tractor-trailers and passenger buses have been used to move illegal drugs. Trucks and trains carrying fresh produce such as watermelons, limes and other fruits and vegetables have been used to bring in narcotics. Drug shipments are often painted green and hidden within crates with fake watermelons or limes. Cocaine has been found in tomato crates.

More in NY Times article

Another method used by smugglers: Coast Guard Intercepting Submarine Carrying $181 Million In Drugs

The Coast Guard Cutter Stratton crew seizes bales from a self-propelled semi-submersible submarine interdicted in international waters off the coast of Central America, July 19, 2015. The Coast Guard recovered more than 6 tons of drugs from the 40-foot vessel.

Efecte economice

– Efectul Cobra

În India, guvernatorul speriat de înmulţirea cobre lor oferea pentru fiecare cap de şarpe un premiu, cu rezultatul că unii au început să crească cobre ca să le vândă.
Efectul cobra este caracteristic situaţiei potrivit căreia, intenţia bună a guvernaţilor are un efect exact contrar.


– Tequila Effect

Informal name given to the impact of the 1994 Mexican economic crisis on the South American economy. The Tequila Effect occurred because of a sudden devaluation in the Mexican peso, which then caused other currencies in the region (the Southern Cone and Brazil) to decline. The falling peso was propped up by US$50 billion loan granted by then U.S. president Bill Clinton.  Also referred to as the “Mexican Shock”.

Immediately after the Mexican peso was devalued in the early days of the Presidency of Ernesto Zedillo, South American countries suffered rapid currency depreciation. It was a known fact that the peso was overvalued, but the extent of Mexico’s economic vulnerability was not well known. Since governments and businesses in the area had high levels of U.S. dollar-denominated debt, the devaluation meant that it would be increasingly difficult to pay back the debts.